Top 10 Open Access Fossil Taxa of 2017: Eekaulostomus cuevasae | PLOS Paleo Community

This is an article I wrote for the PLOS Paleontology Community blog, and am archiving it here. The original post was published on December 28, 2017, and can be accessed here. With the end of the year comes the end to our countdown of the winners of the Top 10 Open Access Fossil Taxa ofContinue reading “Top 10 Open Access Fossil Taxa of 2017: Eekaulostomus cuevasae | PLOS Paleo Community”

Top 10 Open Access Fossil Taxa of 2017: Babelichthys olneyi | PLOS Paleo Community

This unique fish represents the first of its kind in the fossil record, and is named after an infamous sci-fi polyglot!

Veggievore Fish of the Triassic

Fish have a bit of a boring reputation among many vertebrate paleontologists–too many bones, too hard to identify, not as charismatic as dinosaurs, etc., etc. But, this is entirely undeserved (and I say that as a dinosaur paleontologist, too)! The ins and outs of fish evolution are truly fascinating, bolstered by a phenomenal fossil record.Continue reading “Veggievore Fish of the Triassic”

Size Does Matter: Using the size of fossil marine mammals to estimate primary productivity in ancient oceans

As if we need another reason to justify paleontology as an important field of science, here’s a good one: information regarding the history of this planet and its ecosystems is crucial in order to understand the health of our planet today, particularly with regard to sensitive but important topics like climate change. Oceans play a large roleContinue reading “Size Does Matter: Using the size of fossil marine mammals to estimate primary productivity in ancient oceans”

Gone Fishin’ in the Cretaceous: A New Species of Acanthomorph from Canada

For being one of the largest groups of vertebrates, and having one of the richer fossil records among organisms, the relationships of fishes are still hotly debated. Humongous datasets are being compiled that involve molecular (both nuclear and mitochondrial) data, compared and contrasted with thorough morphological analyses. (I’m not going to get into all ofContinue reading “Gone Fishin’ in the Cretaceous: A New Species of Acanthomorph from Canada”

Featured Paleoartist: Studiospectre’s Stephen R. Moore

Speaking on behalf of Andy, Jon, and myself, we are always striving to make the PLOS Paleo Community a useful venue for our readers (and you can help us even more by taking the PLOS Blogs reader survey before February 15!). In addition to presenting and reviewing the latest in paleontology Open Access research, weContinue reading “Featured Paleoartist: Studiospectre’s Stephen R. Moore”

Eocene Fishes from Libya: Completing a Picture of the Past

One of the largest, and sometimes overlooked, fossil record belongs to fishes, spanning hundreds of millions of years since their origin in the mid-Paleozoic. Such an immense fossil record has given ichthyologists an advantage in developing comprehensive hypotheses of evolutionary relationships of fishes both living and extinct. But even with such a expansive fossil record,Continue reading “Eocene Fishes from Libya: Completing a Picture of the Past”