Gone Fishin’ in the Cretaceous: A New Species of Acanthomorph from Canada

For being one of the largest groups of vertebrates, and having one of the richer fossil records among organisms, the relationships of fishes are still hotly debated. Humongous datasets are being compiled that involve molecular (both nuclear and mitochondrial) data, compared and contrasted with thorough morphological analyses. (I’m not going to get into all ofContinue reading “Gone Fishin’ in the Cretaceous: A New Species of Acanthomorph from Canada”

Eocene Fishes from Libya: Completing a Picture of the Past

One of the largest, and sometimes overlooked, fossil record belongs to fishes, spanning hundreds of millions of years since their origin in the mid-Paleozoic. Such an immense fossil record has given ichthyologists an advantage in developing comprehensive hypotheses of evolutionary relationships of fishes both living and extinct. But even with such a expansive fossil record,Continue reading “Eocene Fishes from Libya: Completing a Picture of the Past”

Lungfishes Are Not Airheads!

It’s November, a month to ruminate on all of the things we are thankful for while we ruminate copious amounts of food (at least in the United States). I’ve been contemplating all of the things that I am thankful for, besides the usual suspects (you know, friends, family, a pretty cool research project, and, ofContinue reading “Lungfishes Are Not Airheads!”