Fossil Friday Roundup: October 19, 2018

Featured Image: Glyptodont osteoderms. From de Lima and Porpino (2018), CC-BY.

Papers (All Open Access):

  • Can you make morphometrics work when you know the right answer? Pick and mix approaches for apple identification (PLOS ONE)
  • Spatial and temporal distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediments from Poyang Lake, China (PLOS ONE)
  • Morphological characterization of virus-like particles in coral reef sponges (PeerJ)
  • The Messinian stromatolites of the Sierra del Colmenar (Western Mediterranean): facies characterization and sedimentological interpretation (PeerJ)
  • Morphological diversity of Quercus fossil pollen in the northern South China Sea during the last glacial maximum and its paleoclimatic implication (PLOS ONE)
  • Evolutionary Transition in the Late Neogene Planktonic Foraminiferal Genus Truncorotalia (iScience)
  • Conodonts, Corals and Stromatoporoids from Late Ordovician and Latest Silurian Allochthonous Limestones in the Cuga Burga Volcanics of Central Western New South Wales (Proceedings of the Linnean Society of NSW)
  • ESR Dating Ungulate Teeth and Molluscs from the Paleolithic Site Marathousa 1, Megalopolis Basin, Greece (Quaternary)
  • A Piranha-like Pycnodontiform Fish from the Late Jurassic (Current Biology)
  • The Smallest-Known Neonate Individual of Tylosaurus (Mosasauridae, Tylosaurinae) Sheds New Light on the Tylosaurine Rostrum and Heterochrony (JVP)
  • Morphogenetic mechanism of the acquisition of the dinosaur-type acetabulum (RSOS)
  • The hippocampus of birds in a view of evolutionary connectomics (Cortex)
  • Ectoparasitism and infections in the exoskeletons of large fossil cingulates (PLOS ONE)
  • Nyctereutes (Mammalia, Carnivora, Canidae) from Layna and the Eurasian raccoon-dogs: an updated revision (RIPS)
  • New Paratethyan dwarf baleen whales mark the origin of cetotheres (PeerJ)
  • Dogs accompanied humans during the Neolithic expansion into Europe (Biology Letters)
  • What If the ‘Anthropocene’ Is Not Formalized as a New Geological Series/Epoch? (Quaternary)
  • Can we detect ecosystem critical transitions and signals of changing resilience from paleo‐ecological records? (Ecosphere)

PrePrints and PostPrints:

  • Modelling determinants of extinction across two Mesozoic hyperthermal events (PaleorXiv)
  • Could Late Cretaceous sauropod tooth morphotypes provide supporting evidence for faunal connections between North Africa and Southern Europe? (PeerJ)

Community Events, Society Updates, and Resources:

 Meetings:

  • 2018 Geological Society of America Annual Meeting, November 4–7, 2018, Indianapolis, Indiana (Link)
  • 1st Palaeontological Virtual Congress, December 1–15, 2018 (Link)
    • The 1st Palaeontological Virtual Congress: new abstract deadline, and registration payment methods (SVPOW)
  • North American Paleontological Convention June 23–27 2019 (Link)

Events:

Resources:

  • Teaching in the Grant Museum (UCL)

News and Views:

Animals and Anatomy:

  • Geologists Question ‘Evidence Of Ancient Life’ In 3.7 Billion-Year-Old Rocks (NPR)
  • Episode 95: Plants and Atmosphere (Palaeocast)
  • Fun with Foraminifera (Time Scavengers)
  • The Secret to Dinosaur Hip Shape (Laelaps)
  • Sacral pneumatization in sauropods was complex (SVPOW)
  • Maybe pneumaticity is variable because it’s built on a shaky foundation (SVPOW)
  • Fossil Friday – Dynamoterror dynastes (Valley of the Mastodon)
  • Bats That Eat Fish (Synapsida)

Methods and Musings:

Featured Folks, Fieldwork, and Museums:

  • Mike Taylor interview by Szymon Górnicki (SVPOW)
  • Guest Post: Learning about preprints with PREreview (PLOS ECR Community)
  • TetZooCon 2018 Day 2 (LITC)

Do you have some news, a blog, or something just plain cool you want to share with the PLOS Paleo Community? Email it to us at paleocommunity@plos.org, tweet it to us at @PLOSPaleo, or message us on Facebook.

Published by Sarah Z. Gibson

Dr. Sarah Z. Gibson is a paleontologist and science communicator based in Minnesota. Her research focuses on the evolutionary history of ray-finned fishes from the Early Mesozoic. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6784-3980

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